Who believed that The Camera is the Least Important Element in Photography

October 29th, 2012

Thanks to New York architectural photographer, Donna Dotan for reminding me that October 10 would have been Julius Shulman’s 102 birthday. Donna is a Julius Shulman fan, as am I. Here’s what she says about Shulman in her recent Fall newsletter.

For those of you that don’t know Julius Shulman, he is probably the most talented and well known Architectural photographer of our time. He died in July of 2009 at the age of 98. Shulman captured the work of nearly every modern and progressive architect since the 1930s including Frank Lloyd Wright, Richard Neutra, John Lautner and Frank Gehry. His images epitomized the singular beauty of Southern Californias modernist movement and brought its iconic structures to the attention of the general public. Here are some of his more well known images. And, ya, it was Shulman that  believed the camera is the least important element in photography.

In the year after Shulman died a fantastic movie was created documenting his life a work. The film is titled Visual Acoustics is directed by Eric Bricker and narrated by Dustin Hoffman. Here is the theatrical trailer for the film.

There are at least 14 books on Shulman’s work. My favorite is Photographing Architecture and Interiors, which is his first book, originally published in 1962. Anyone passionate about architectural and interior photography needs to take a close look at Shulman’s work.

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4 Responses to “Who believed that The Camera is the Least Important Element in Photography”

  • Worth watching, its on Netflix Watch Instantly if you have it.

  • You wrote: “For those of you that don’t know Julius Shulman, he is probably the most talented and well known Architectural photographer of our time”.
    I do not know him, but his pictures really look good.
    But please explain your writing? Is that an opinion base on other architectural photographers in the US or in the whole world?

  • His understanding of architecture and the built environment is what made him a master.

  • The person behind the camera is the most important facet of photography, be it real estate, architecture, commercial, landscape, or portrait. Your compositions, your eye and your view of the space are much more important than the camera you have in front of your face.

    Michael

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