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Sell Yourself With The Technology You Use To Sell Homes?

February 1st, 2011

Here is a video I just ran across on the platinumhd.tv site (Brett Clements’ real estate video company in Australia).

I was struck by two things about this video that makes it a valuable example that all real estate photographers should study :

  1. The first third (up through about 1:00) of the video is one of the best presentations I’ve seen that powerfully makes the case for quality real estate photography. Great copy and compelling images. I have some similar words in one of my e-books they don’t come across any were near as powerful as the message comes across in this video. Mainly because the video is illustrating the words!
  2. The last two thirds of the video then smoothly moves into using video to explain why PlatinumHD is the company you want to shoot your video. That is, they are using the same technology they use to sell homes to sell themselves.

I believe this is a brilliant example of how to sell yourself as a real estate photographer! Sell the need for real estate photography and then sell how you can fill that need. Thanks Brett for this wonderful example!

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8 Responses to “Sell Yourself With The Technology You Use To Sell Homes?”

  • That is a great idea. I will keep this in mind when the time comes to start making real estate videos – a very short plug extolling the virtues of the service. Incredible work – I didn’t realize how much time, equipment, and man hours goes into these presentations.

    Great concept, I’ll be using it!

  • I’m so grateful to companies like PlatiniumHD for continuing to “raise the bar” when it comes to professional real estate photography/video. In an age where Flip cameras are in every real estate agent’s pocket, it’s encouraging to see a company doing it the right way.

  • @Daniel- Even though this example is shot in video there’s nothing preventing this approach working for stills. That is, if you only shoot stills you can still put together a series of stills into a video with a narration track (you can buy professional narration for about $25/ minute) and make a YouTube video. No real need to shot video for this approach to work!

  • Everything about this video is just fantastic! (I certainly have a l….o….n….g way to go in developing my skills!!)

  • Actually Amanda. You don’t have a l…o…n…g way to go. You’re already there. The great thing about sites’ like Larry’s is the whole world, and all its ideas, come straight to you. I love this new thing called Crowd Accelerated Innovation. It drives us all higher. Daniel. Phil. Thanks for your kind words.
    I think the lines are blurring between stills and video. Convergence. I know I have learnt more from still photography in the two years since the release of the 5DMII than I learnt in a lifetime of being a dedicated director, producer and, only in the late 90s, a cinematographer, as a part-time ‘amateur’ photographer. All our CREW look to the best photographers in the world for inspiration for their images.
    There is a great deal we have learnt from the world of high-end real estate photography. Studying it is a constant pursuit.
    If you had seen the photographs we were taking two years ago….mmm.
    I think we need to go beyond photographers versus cinematographers.
    Digital art is converging. We can learn from each other. And make each other better in the process. At the end of the day, it is all becoming ‘one art’.
    The traditionalists could argue Larry has really gone out on a ledge introducing so much video content to this site.
    On the other hand, a few years ago, there was no such term as HDSLR.
    That’s progress.
    If you ever need a hand Amanda, you just yell.

  • @Brett,

    What stands out to me Brett is your sensibility regarding marketing and sales. Your videos are absolutely amazing, I don’t think anyone can argue with your claim at being the best in the world in this genre of cinematography. But behind the skills of your team is your understanding of the role of marketing in real estate. True across the board, but even more so with high-end real estate, value must be established. It’s not about price; it’s about value. And this seems to be an issue for many starting into real estate photography – how to price my service. Focus less on price and more on value. Your videos establish value beyond the actual structure being sold. You paint a picture of a playground for that next buyer of one of the properties. I like this quote from your site: “We make films that sink an emotional hook into the audience. Driving your sale.” Now, we (service providers of marketing for the real estate industry) have to do the same thing with our services, driving our own sales. Dig into what makes our clients emotional, keeping them up at night. How do your services/photography solve that?

  • Brett, yet another stunning video. I know 99% of the world will never go to the lengths that you and your team do but it is inspiring to see what is possible when all limitations are thrown out the window. These videos make me want to get serious equipment and work harder to develop my skills as an amateur photography buff.

  • Hi Walt. That’s a hard one to answer as it has so many layers.
    I suppose there’s two.
    1. Pricing. That old phrase “The price you put on yourself…” I think there’s a real danger in joining in any race to the bottom. My gut is a good HDSLR operator with a decent quiver of lenses, offering photography and cinematography that is professional – creatively framed, property exposed, in focus – and delivered in a timeframe, is worth at least $550 an hour. You are, after all, a mobile office.
    Out of that comes tax, plus GST in our country, car, gas, power, office, software, public liability, equipment upgrades etc, etc – it doesn’t leave a lot for profit. Especially if you want to run a legal business and pay taxes.
    Obviously, with volume from Clients, you can afford to do better deals. There are some operators in our area diving down to $90 for a package of video and stills. One day, a prestige Agent with a $29 million listing will see their listing burnt to the ground when a hot light tips over, or trips the mains. And I bet that $90 photographer won’t be hanging around to pony up the damage bill. And maybe then real estate agents will understand the difference between professional and amateur. But they may be a long time coming. But our ‘industry’ needs to establish some Association and some standards. 99.9% of other industries have an Association. Why not us? Larry. You have enough Members to join an international one.
    2. With this as a base, creativity, passion, hard work and relationships could then see artists who are more in demand raise their fees – without comprising a base-line for developing talent.
    3. Philosophy. I personally try and look beyond the four walls and find the reason people live in a home or an area and drive in on that angle to build the message around. In 2011, we’re focused on making ‘ads’ on homes not virtual tours and our thinking is cinematography should compliment photography. If you hone in on an angle and channel all the production values at that idea, you should come away with a small but compelling piece of film that will drive the audience to a site to discover more and varied information. More photographs and more facts.
    4. Believe in what you’re doing, develop your own style and your own ‘take’ and know you have a place in the world.
    5. Understand the business and your Clients. Like, really understand them. The first year I spent in real estate (not by choice – and that’s another story) I spent my days hanging out with Agents shooting Agent profiles; shooting Agency conferences – and cutting and re-cutting. The formats we rolled out with were shaped by the people we worked with. That still happens today. It is their show. Not ours.
    6. Get on the court and get some skin in the game.
    Walt. I don’t know whether any of the above served to answer any of your questions. I know the US market is completely different to ours, however I suspect we may have a better environment Down Under in which to run this business model. We’ve Agents to thank for that. Largely, they make Vendors pay for their own advertising – which is why we don’t have a lot of Agents taking their own photographs or shooting their own videos. I ain’t going back to that discussion though. 🙂

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