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Another E-mail Marketing Example

June 24th, 2009

There was a lot of interest in the e-mail marketing post I did back on June 10. Michael Yearout sent me some data on his drip marketing campaign so I thought I’d pass it along to show that there’s more than one way to do e-mail marketing.

First of all Michael uses ratepoint.com for his e-mail management system and here is an example e-mail that Michael sent out. Here are the stats on his e-mail campaign:

  1. Since April 1 of 2009 he has sent 9 “email blasts.”  Averaging 1 every week to 10 days.
  2. He sends the email to 450 plus or minus real estate agents in the county where he lives.  He obtained the email list from the Summit Association of Realtors (which he joined as an affiliate member).  There are a few builders and architects in the list, as well as a couple of personal friends, but the vast majority or real estate agents.
  3. The average “open” rate for these past 9 emails was 27%.  The highest open rate was 40% and the lowest was 19%.
  4. Average “click throughs” to one of the links in the emails was 10%. The highest was 44% and the lowest 2%.
  5. Michael did a survey a year or so ago of these agents asking them if they found the emails useful, how often I should send them, what day of the week and time of day they wanted to receive them, etc. The majority of respondents’ said they wanted to receive the emails every week or two, Wednesday was the most popular day and 10 a.m. the best time.  And they did find the emails useful
  6. On average, Michael gets 1 – 2 calls after each email.  About 50% of the time it’s a previous client wanting a new shoot, and the other half the time it is a new client wanting information (rates, etc.) or wanting to schedule a new shoot.
  7. Email is Michael’s primary marketing tool. He says he does some print advertising in the Summit Association of Realtors monthly newsletter and holiday cards to everyone with a personal “thank you for your business.”
  8. In summary Michael says:  “Although it is slower now than it was last year at this time.  I think it’s due to the economy and some increased competition in my local area – we’ve had one new photographer enter the market and he’s “low-balling” the rest of us and taking away some business. Time will tell if his tactics give him a firm foothold in the area.”

I’d like to point out that if Michael’s open rates and click-through rates sound higher that usual it’s probably because he’s sending it to a list that has past clients and members of an association that he belongs to. So many of the people recognize his name. If you are just starting out you may not have this name recognition, but that’s OK, that’s the purpose of a drip campaign, to build your name recognition.

Another point is I suggest that you track your stats for each e-mail you send and make improvements or changes each time. The idea is that better wording, better design and even color has an effect on what your click-through rate is. Your goal is try to figure out what works best.

Thanks Michael for sharing your data and experiences with everyone.

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4 Responses to “Another E-mail Marketing Example”

  • Hi Great post very informative, this is a huge challenge for a lot of people at the moment.

    A great solution for this problem is to create your very own web TV show, this has improved open rates and click through rates for me beyond belief.

    Regards Mark

  • I’ve looked into this and found that everything depends upon where you get your email lists. If it’s not a list of folks who “opted in”, it’s spam and you can get blacklisted by ISPs.

    A workaround is to customize the email for each recipient – lots of work.

    How to build a list of op-ins from scratch?

    http://SanDiegoRealEstatePhotography.com

  • Thank you for the post. We have dabbled with email campaign programs. I feel like they are successful over time, but don’t yield immediate results. However, the information above is encouraging.

  • Thanks for the info Michael. Looks like a nice marketing job. Let us know what the response was like.

    David Eichler

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